Teaching Treasures™


homonyms
by Ingrid Griggs

The English meaning of the word Homonym, are words spelt the same, sound the same but mean something totally different? You may know some like; saw - saw or stand - stand.

Below are some examples of unusual words and sayings. Read through these, then do the task.

Your Task:
Make a list of unusual words that are written the same, sound the same but have a different meaning. How many can you find?

LIGHTNING
Clipper ship, 2083 tons. Built in 1854 and reputed to be one of the fastest sailing vessels ever built. Made several trips from England to Australia and New Zealand. Carried thousands of passengers until destroyed by fire off Geelong in 1869.
LIGHTNING
A flash of light in the sky, occurring during a thunderstorm and caused by a discharge of static electricity either between clouds or between a cloud and the earth.
MONITOR
Newspaper founded in Sydney in 1826 by Edward Smith Hall. Joined Australian (newspaper run by W.C. Wentworth and Robert Wardell) in attacks on Gov. Darling and in the struggle for freedom of the press in N.S.W. Hall was sued for libel, gaoled and printing of paper stopped by Darling. Publication of the Monitor finally ceased in 1838.
MONITOR
A computer device used for viewing a current program

Also a person or piece of equipment that warns,
checks, controls or keeps a continuous record of something.

GRETEL
1st Australian 12-metre challenger for the America's Cup in 1962. Skippered by Jock Sturrock, she was the first postwar challenger to win a race. She lost another 3 and the challenge.
GRETEL
Girl character in the story Hansel and Gretel.
FREMANTLE DOCTOR
Refreshing summer breeze which blows from about midday to late afternoon in the Fremantle area, Western Australia.
FREMANTLE DOCTOR
A medical professional lending his services to the people in Fremantle, a town in Western Australia.
FLY
Fly H.M.S. Survey ship sent to examine North Queensland coast and Great Barrier Reef in 1843. Also explored the coast of New Guinea in 1845. Fly R is named after this ship.
FLY
An insect.

LIMB
Robert(Bobby) Limb. Born Adelaide 1926. He was a comedian and musician. Joined Bob Gibson's band in Melbourne 1946 and later formed his own band. Several years later he opened Colony Club in Sydney with Dawn Lake, whom he married. Toured England with Moss Empire Circuit, appeared on BBC and at London Palladium. Toured Australia 1957 and has had own TV show since 1958. Won Logie Award 1961 as best national comedian on TV and special comedy award 1962.

LIMB
An arm or leg or the analogous part on an animal
such as a wing.

Also any of the main branches of a tree.
 

DRUMMER
Fish found near rocky coasts, East and South Australia. Flesh is edible but not rated highly. Closely resembles Rock Blackfish, which is also sometimes called Drummer.
DRUMMER
A person who plays a drum or a set of drums which is a percussion instrument sounded by striking a membrane stretched across the opening of a hollow cylinder or hemisphere.

Here is a link to a US site that has the American/English meaning to the word homonym.

Alan Cooper's Homonyms

Collins English Dictionary:  Homonym - 1) One of a group of words pronounced or spelt in the same way but having different meanings. 2) A person with the same name as another. 3) Biology - a specific or generic name that has been used for two or more different organisms. (From Latin homonymum. - From Greek homonumon, from homonumos of the same name.)


Websters Comprehensive Dictionary USA Homonym - 1) A word identical with another in pronunciation, but differing from it in spelling and meaning, as fair - fare, read - reed; also called homophone. 2) A Homograph. 3) A word identical with another in spelling and pronunciation, but differing from it in origin and meaning, as butter - the food, and butter - one who butts. 4) One who has the same name as another, namesake. 5) Biol. - A generic or specific name rejected because of its previous application to another animal or plant.

Homonym is used with a variety of meanings, the most common sense being that of definition 1 above. Although homophone is etymologically more precise and is unambiguous in meaning, homonym is nevertheless the more commonly used form in this sense. Homonym is also, but less commonly, used interchangeably with homograph.





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