Teaching Treasures™ Precept upon Precept - Line upon Line



PRECEPT UPON PRECEPT - LINE UPON LINE Google+


What is required for the year
Most educators wonder not only at the beginning, but during the entire school year what formal skills, life-lessons and habits their students should acquire as they progress during the year. Will you be able to continue to teach what is required for the year? Will you be able to cope with the remaining months left of this year? Some educators, are still coming to terms with the change if this is their first year of formal tutoring.


Which approach
Teaching methods change within schooling systems quite often and it is sometimes difficult to discern what approach you should take. It can leave some educators confused about what they could expect from their students and how best to help them achieve their goals.

As an educator you can look at the previous standards attained and get a fair idea of what is required, although you will soon find that your standards will differ somewhat to those already in place. You may want to improve one facet or a whole myriad of issues.


Learning at different rates
Below you will find a short outline for years seven to ten. This is a guide only and you need to be aware that each student is different and unique in their way. Each person learns at a different rate and acquires knowledge and life-skills at different times in their life.


Build upon achievements
As a child understands simple concepts those are built upon and expanded. The Bible puts it more accurately; precept upon precept - line upon line (Isaiah 28:10) building upon achievements or outcomes. As parents and teachers instruct children they will see the outcomes or achievements and build upon them.

For parents who teach their children at home or thinking about their responsibilities it may be helpful to visit our home school area.


Year 7

What they are like:
Average age 11½ to 13. At this stage children like to be young adults who often expect to be treated as such. Sensitive and cautious in many ways, yet full of enthusiasm and zest for life. They often consider schoolwork a drudge. Encouragement, varied incentives and enthusiasm on your part is absolutely necessary.


What they should know:
They should be able to effectively use many types of reference books with the ability to cross-reference. Read street directories and use a telephone book accurately. Use correct grammar and have good spelling. Use punctuation correctly, research and summarize. Be able to communicate across a wide age group, not just their own peers. Use different strategies to solve Mathematical problems, read graphs, multiply fractions and decimals. Understand percentages and basic algebra should be introduced in the second half of the year.


Focus for the year:
They should understand that the responsibility for learning and achieving their educational outcomes lies with them. They are probably still considering the future and what they may like to do as a profession. Help steer their interests in the right direction, focus in on what they enjoy. Encourage what they are really good at, examine different job opportunities.
Suggestions can be made for future employment in those areas also. This may seem early in life but you will find that those who have no focus early in life often have problems focusing on these issues later on. Make sure that children advancing to secondary school are able to work effectively and independently, showing mature study habits.


Important subjects:
Continue to concentrate on advanced English and advanced Mathematical skills. Technology becomes more important, especially computer and Internet knowledge which will be used extensively during secondary schooling, so a good grounding is necessary. All other subjects are just as important. Expand on artistic abilities. Introduce a second language at this stage if it hasn't been done.


Best way to help:
Children can be obnoxious and disrespectful at this age if early behaviour was not guided properly. This can be rectified however with plenty of patience and love. Discuss behavioural problems with a trustworthy colleague, not in front of your student. Have a separate discussion with your student at their comprehension level.
Maybe you could discuss the fact that each one has their respective jobs to complete and this needs to be done properly in order to have a harmonious atmosphere. Your job is to teach and the student's job is to learn if they wish to achieve anything.


Year 8


What they are like:
Average age 12½ to 14. Children at this age are very sensitive and get upset, offended or stressed out easily. They are also full of life and it is sometimes hard to keep up with them physically. Their knowledge base is fairly broad and you might need to expand your own knowledge base in certain areas in order to understand and ascertain what students at this age are talking about. Times are changing!


What they should know:
Advanced English and Mathematics with proper values, attitudes and beliefs. They should be able to listen and respond with a responsible attitude. Cultural understanding and historical knowledge.
Mathematical understanding of chance and data, space and algebra. They should be able to work Scientifically concerning science in daily life. Understand concepts of earth and beyond, energy and change, life and living and natural resources. Active citizenship should be encouraged.


Focus for the year:
Continue to build solid foundations on what they have learned. Explore wider areas of Technology and Scientific experiments. Continue to develop a second language if one was learned previous year. Learn more about the Arts in Society, art skills and processes.


Important subjects:
English and Mathematics are number one subjects. Science, Technology, Social Studies, Health and physical development and Art all follow. Environmental awareness and global economy should be touched upon.


Best way to help:
Be there! Don't assume they don't need you any more because they are older and act more grown up. They are still children who need your guidance, instructions and love for a long time to come.


Year 9


What they are like:
Average age 13 to 15. Stubbornness is common and rebellion often follows if left unattended for too long. Guide with respect, love and re-assure their security and confidence. They need your input, so be there for them.


What they should know:
Advanced English and Mathematics with proper values, attitudes and beliefs. They should be able to listen and respond with a responsible attitude. Cultural understanding and historical knowledge. They should be able to investigate, communicate and participate in social areas. Mathematical understanding of chance and data, space and algebra.
They should be able to work scientifically concerning science in daily life. Understand concepts of earth and beyond, energy and change, life and living and natural resources. Active citizenship should further be promoted. Politics and legal systems should be taught.


Focus for the year:
Continue to build solid foundations on what they have learned. Explore wider areas of Technology and scientific experiments. Continue to develop a second language if one was learned previous year. Learn more about cultural identities, natural and economic systems. In Mathematics the focus will be on solving equations and re-enforcing algebra.


Important subjects:
At this level all subjects are important and students may even wish to add more electives to their workload.


Best way to help:
They will stumble upon academic problems which may even baffle you. Don't be afraid to ask help from someone with more knowledge than you in relevant areas. Most people are more than happy to offer their expertise, time permitting. Encourage your students to not let television or computer games come before studies, keep a watchful eye out for temptations which may lead to regret afterwards. Be there for your students!


Year 10


What they are like:
Average age 15 to 17. You're not dealing with children any more but rather with young adults. They like their own space and privacy. Sometimes withdrawn and at other times untamable. Enjoy their vibrant lifestyle and encourage as much communication as possible between yourself and them.


What they should know:
Advanced English and Mathematics. They should be able to listen and respond with a responsible attitude. Cultural understanding and historical knowledge across several countries and continents. They should be able to investigate in-depth, communicate and participate well in social areas. They should have a good grasp of science in daily life.
Understand Technological concepts of investigating, devising, producing and evaluating. Acknowledge different techniques and styles of reaching an outcome. Active citizenship should continue to be promoted. Political and legal systems need to be understood and explored more widely.


Focus for the year:
Continue to build on the previous year's efforts with more independence and self-assurance. Good self-management skills and interpersonal skills are paramount.


Important subjects:
At this level, all subjects are important and students may even wish to add a more advanced workload. Some local youth projects may be of advantage to include in the agenda.


Best way to help:
Like the previous year they will stumble upon academic problems which may even baffle you. Don't be afraid to ask help from someone with more knowledge than you. Most people are more than happy to offer their expertise, time permitting. Encourage your students to not let  television or computer games come before studies, keep a watchful eye out for temptations which may lead to regret afterwards. Be there for your students, if you neglect them they will neglect you and your teaching efforts will be wasted.


Rom 15:4 For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope. Other Articles

 

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