© Copyright 2000 Teaching Treasures Publications

frog head Lesson Plan 5

  • Subject: Taaruk as bush tucker.
  • Introduction: Bush tucker was and still is a valuable food source for animals, birds, insects and humans.
  • Student Objective: To learn the value of bush foods, understand survival skills, learn what is edible and useful about certain bush plants, realize that bush plants are also used for medicinal purposes, understand the legal and environmental issues associated with collecting bush tucker.
  • Learning Outcomes: Society and Environment, Technology, Science, English, Maths and Art.
  • Materials needed: Enthusiastic students, pen, paper, paints, art supplies, computer, scanner, multimedia, internet access, dictionary, public or school library access. Optional: camera or digital camera.
  • Select age group:   Ages 5-7        Ages 8-10        Ages 11-13       Ages 14-16

 

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frog head Ages 5-7

Step: (If possible collect several taaruk flowers and leaves beforehand)

  1. Ask students if they know what bush tucker is.
  2. Can one student give an example of bush tucker?
  3. Discuss that it is illegal to dig up bush plants unless you have special permission.
  4. Explain that although we are talking about a plant as bush tucker, it can also be fish or an animal.
  5. Read the introduction web page about the taaruk to your student.
  6. Locate a library book with pictures of taaruk to show your students.
  7. Discuss what insects do when they land on the flowers. (Pollinate, collect nectar etc.)
  8. Explain that taaruk were named by botanists.
  9. Explain what a botanist does.
  10. Ask students to draw taaruk by looking at the web site picture or library book as an example. This can be done with pencils or paints.
  11. Ask students to write the words 'taaruk'  on their drawing. Ask them to write something about taaruk if they can.
  12. Use white and green crepe-paper to make taaruk flowers and leaves. Make a taaruk display when they're all finished.
  13. Make a large display banner with your students with the heading 'taaruk'. Hang it above the display.
  14. If possible, organise a walk where taaruk grow.

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frog head Ages 8-10

Step: (If possible collect several taaruk flowers and leaves beforehand)

  1. Ask students if they know what bush tucker is.
  2. Can one student give an example of bush tucker?
  3. Discuss that it is illegal to dig up bush plants unless you have special permission. Aborigines have permission in certain areas and are still using bush tucker as part of their diet.
  4. Explain that although we are talking about a plant as bush tucker, it can also be fish or an animal.
  5. Ask students to read the introduction web page about the taaruk
  6. Ask students to locate a library book with pictures of taaruk.
  7. Discuss what insects do when they land on the flowers. (Pollinate, collect nectar etc.)
  8. Explain that taaruk were named by botanists.
  9. Ask students to find out what a botanist does.
  10. Ask students to draw taaruk by looking at the web site picture or library book as an example. This can be done with pencils or paints.
  11. Ask students to write a short essay about taaruk, where it grows, what it looks like and what parts are edible or used for medicinal purposes.
  12. Ask students to explore the Internet by searching for the given topic in a search engine.
  13. If possible, organise a walk where taaruk grow.

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frog head Ages 11-13

Step: (If possible collect several taaruk flowers and leaves beforehand)

  1. Ask students if they know what bush tucker is.
  2. Can several students give an example of bush tucker?
  3. Discuss that it is illegal to dig up bush plants unless you have special permission. Aborigines have permission in certain areas and are still using bush tucker as part of their diet.
  4. Explain that although we are talking about a plant as bush tucker, it can also be fish or an animal.
  5. Ask students to read the introduction web page about the taaruk
  6. Ask students to locate a library book dealing with taaruk. It should contain some pictures.
  7. Discuss what insects do when they land on the flowers. (Pollinate, collect nectar etc.)
  8. Explain that taaruk were named by botanists.
  9. Ask students to find out what a botanist does.
  10. Ask students to locate a book or internet site about a famous botanist and read about this person.
  11. Ask students to draw taaruk by looking at the web site picture or library book as an example. This can be done with pencils or paints.
  12. Ask students to write an essay about taaruk, where it grows, what it looks like, what parts are edible, if it has medicinal purposes and its Scientific name.
  13. Ask students to explore the Internet by searching for the given topic in a search engine.
  14. If possible, organise a walk where taaruk grow.

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frog head Ages 14-16

Step: (If possible collect several taaruk flowers and leaves beforehand)

  1. Can several students give an example of bush tucker?
  2. Explain that although we are talking about a plant as bush tucker, it can also be fish or an animal.
  3. Ask students to read the introduction web page about taaruk
  4. Ask students to locate a library book dealing with taaruk. It should contain some pictures and Scientific facts.
  5. Discuss what insects do when they land on the flowers. (Pollinate, collect nectar etc.)
  6. Explain that botanists name the plant species. Ask students to find out what a botanist does. 
  7. When they have found out ask students to locate a book or internet site about a famous botanist. Ask them to bookmark their research for inclusion in their essay.
  8. Discuss that it is illegal to dig up bush plants unless you have special permission. Aborigines have permission in certain areas and are still using bush tucker as part of their diet. Ask students to find out who to contact if they wanted permission to explore and sample bush tucker for research purposes. They should include this information in their essay as well.
  9. Learn together about the environment, discuss the environmental impact of clear felling, bush fires or vandalism. This can also be included in their essay.
  10. Ask students to explore the Internet by searching for the given topic in a search engine.
  11. Ask students to write an essay (by hand or with the use of a computer) about taaruk, where it grows, what it looks like, what parts are edible, if it has medicinal purposes, its Scientific name and all other facts they have previous researched.
  12. Ask students to draw taaruk on their essay work (if done by hand) by looking at the web site picture or library book as an example. This can be done with pencils or paints. The drawings can be scanned and placed on their work if they have done it with the help of the computer.
  13. If possible, organise a walk where taaruk grow.
  14. Pictures can be taken and scanned or use a digital camera.

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© Copyright 2000 Teaching Treasures Publications