Match the elements with the correct explanation


HOW TO DO THIS:

Match the elements with the correct explanation. First find the correct dictionary meaning for each element in your dictionary.

Colour code (by colouring the two matching boxes) the Atomic number, Chemical symbol, Chemical name,
the Relative atomic mass and the dictionary explanation using the colour key below.

 

    yellow - gold     red - hydrogen
    orange - copper     blue - oxygen
    green - iron     purple - silver
    pink - carbon     grey - tin
    brown - lead     light blue - helium

 

47
Ag
Silver
107.9
A malleable silvery-white metallic element. it is used in alloys, esp. in bronze and pewter and as a non-corroding coating for steel. 26
Fe
Iron
55.9
A dense inert bright yellow element that is the most malleable and ductile metal, occurring in rocks and alluvial deposits.
A colourless, odourless highly reactive gaseous element; the most abundant element in the earth's crust.
79
Au
Gold
197.0
A heavy toxic, bluish-white metallic element that is highly malleable: used in alloys, accumulators, cable sheaths, paints and as a radiation shield. 8
O
Oxygen
16.0
29
Cu
Copper
63.5
A non-metallic element existing in three crystalline forms; graphite, diamond and buckminsterfullerence: occurring in all organic compounds. 50
Sn
Tin
118.7
A very light non-flammable colourless, odourless element that is an inert gas, occurring in certain natural gases.
A malleable ductile silvery-white ferromagnetic metallic element. It is widely used for structural and engineering purposes.  1
H
Hydrogen
1.0
A ductile malleable brilliant greyish-white element having the highest electrical and thermal conductivity of any metal.  6
C
Carbon
12.0
2
He
Helium
4.0
A flammable, colourless gas that is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. Occurs in water and in most organic compounds. 82
Pb
Lead
207.2
A malleable reddish metallic element occurring as the free metal, copper glance, and copper pyrites, used in such alloys as brass and bronze.

 

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